My name is Allison Sullivan and I am thrilled to be a part of Mpower Fitness and the opportunity to teach one of my great passions, yoga. I graduated from Texas A&M in 2000 with a degree in Special Education and returned to Aggieland as soon as possible! I am married with four children and enjoy reading, writing, dates with my husband, car dancing with my kids, soulful music, ferocious friendships, and being active. I discovered yoga in 1999 as a way to stay strong and healthy. My practice helped me to love and appreciate my body in a new way. I received certification from Yahweh Yoga in 2011 and my instruction reflects my passion for the science, spirit, strength and solitude that yoga can provide. I am especially passionate about teaching classes with a Christian influence that help us to Be Still and Know. My classes explore flowing sequences as well as deep holding of postures. Students of all levels of experience and ability are enthusiastically welcomed.
In addition to his role with MPOWER Fitness, Teddy is a PhD student at Texas A&M. His studies focus on Strategic Management in the Sports Industry. Prior to starting at A&M, Teddy worked as a sports facility consultant for Major League Baseball. He has also worked in the fitness industry as a personal trainer for a nationwide health club and at Florida State University's (FSU) Campus Recreation Center. He earned his Masters of Sports Management from the University of Southern Mississippi in 2013 and his Bachelor's in Political Science from FSU in 2011. In his spare time, he enjoys playing golf, watching football, and reading.
Always be sure you get regular servings of dairy products, calcium-rich tofu and greens, and calcium-fortified orange juice. Also, eat lean meat and/or high-quality protein combinations such as pinto beans and rice. Avoid fiber supplements as these bind calcium and other minerals in the intestinal tract. When this happens the absorption of essential nutrients decreases.
My name is Brooke Duncum and I am IBBFA Barre Certified. I grew up in the Sugar Land area of the southwest side of Houston. I started dance at a very young age with a local studio, where I performed, competed, and took classes all over the country. When I got to high school, I joined the dance team, becoming an officer my senior year. I pursued my dance education at the University of Arizona, but after a few years I realized that my love for my home state and family was too great, and moved back to finish my education. I ended with a BS with an emphasis in early child development. After college and as I got older it was harder to stay in the dance world, so I started looking into other forms of group fitness, staring with yoga. Then came spin class, and Bootcamp. I love all forms of group fitness and believe it is very important in our daily lives. A few years ago I learned about the growing love for barre classes, took one and was hooked. It is a great overall, low impact workout that combines ballet and yoga. It helps keep our muscles long and lean. Helps with posture and flexibility, two things that are hard to maintain as we get older. In addition to dance and fitness, I work with my husband building custom homes. I love interior design, spending time with family and friends, music, traveling, and baking
If you do decide to diet, you still need to maintain good nutrition. You want to cut back on calories, not nutrients. And while you want to reduce fat, don't eliminate it entirely. Some studies suggest that older women who maintain a higher body-fat percentage are less likely to suffer from osteoporosis and other conditions associated with menopause. Fat cells also retain estrogen, which helps maintain the calcium in your bones. Younger women should be careful, too: a low body fat percentage can lead to infertility; below 17 percent may lead to missed periods, also known as amenorrhea.
As the table above shows, some of the best sources of calcium are dairy products. However, dairy products such as whole milk, cheese, and yogurt also tend to contain high levels of saturated fat. The USDA recommends limiting your saturated fat intake to no more than 10% of your daily calories, meaning you can enjoy whole milk dairy in moderation and opt for no- or low-fat dairy products when possible. Just be aware that reduced fat dairy products often contain lots of added sugar, which can have negative effects on both your health and waistline.
If motivation is your hang-up, change your exercise routine every 14 days. A University of Florida study discovered that people who modified their workouts twice a month were more likely than to stick to their plans compared to those who changed their regimens whenever they wanted to. Boredom didn’t appear to be a factor; it seems people simply enjoyed the variety more.

“It was a privilege to have taken the course with you. Already, I have used the cueing methods on 2 clients. I have also taken the initiative to ask one of my post-natal client today about her birthing journey and she was so open and excited to share with me. It struck me that usually nobody asks them about it as more attention is focused on the baby.”
Sugar is a source of calories, not nutrients. Consuming too much sugar can lead to weight gain and tooth decay. Contrary to what many people think, there is no evidence linking high-sugar diets to hyperactivity or diabetes. However, high-fructose corn syrup, found in most processed foods, is linked with obesity, and obesity increases your risk for developing diabetes and other conditions. 

My name is Allison Sullivan and I am thrilled to be a part of Mpower Fitness and the opportunity to teach one of my great passions, yoga. I graduated from Texas A&M in 2000 with a degree in Special Education and returned to Aggieland as soon as possible! I am married with four children and enjoy reading, writing, dates with my husband, car dancing with my kids, soulful music, ferocious friendships, and being active. I discovered yoga in 1999 as a way to stay strong and healthy. My practice helped me to love and appreciate my body in a new way. I received certification from Yahweh Yoga in 2011 and my instruction reflects my passion for the science, spirit, strength and solitude that yoga can provide. I am especially passionate about teaching classes with a Christian influence that help us to Be Still and Know. My classes explore flowing sequences as well as deep holding of postures. Students of all levels of experience and ability are enthusiastically welcomed.

First off, if you suspect you have a vitamin deficiency or you fall into one of those groups, you should definitely chat with your doctor or dietitian to determine which are lacking in your diet. And like I stated earlier, if you want to be sure you getting the recommended levels of vitamins and nutrients, I recommend a multivitamin like New Chapter’s Every Woman’s One Daily Multivitamin. It’s expertly formulated for active women with nutrients for energy, stress, immune, heart and bone support*. My favorite thing about them is that they’re made with superfood herbal blends that include ginger, organic turmeric, chamomile and European elderberry. The cool thing about New Chapter’s supplements is that they’re fermented with probiotics and whole foods, so they’re gentle enough to take on an empty stomach.** They’re also Non-GMO Project Verified, gluten-free, and vegetarian, which is great for so many lifestyles.
To help you learn how to eat healthfully, start with the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) dietary guidelines system, which you can find at http://www.mypyramid.gov. The MyPyramid system, which looks somewhat like the familiar food pyramid of old, offers guidance based on individual needs and replaces "serving" recommendations with actual amounts of food. It also emphasizes the importance of balancing nutritious (and tasty!) food choices from all food groups every day with daily physical activity.
A year later, a second Harvard study added to the concern. The Physicians' Health Study of 20,885 men did not evaluate diet per se, but it did measure the blood levels of ALA in 120 men who developed prostate cancer and compared them with the levels in 120 men who remained free of the disease. Men with moderately high ALA blood levels were 3.4 times more likely to develop prostate cancer than men with the lowest levels; curiously, though, men with the very highest levels were only 2 times more likely to get the disease.
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