Try not to think that you can't eat certain foods because you're "too overweight." According to the National Eating Disorder Association, dieting, drive for thinness, and body dissatisfaction can become internalized at a young age and lead to an eating disorder. Change your mindset to celebrate the healthy foods you're eating because they're helping your body stay healthy and energized.
If you want to lose weight, you're going to need to do more exercise than you might expect. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), healthy people of normal weight need at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity (or some combination of the two) every week to maintain weight and avoid excess gain. If you're hypothyroid and want to lose weight, you may need to do more than an hour a day of exercise.
Constantly eating when you don’t need the fuel is a major contributor to weight gain. Before you pop something into your mouth, ask yourself why you’re eating. (We’re lookin’ at you Ms. Office Candy Bowl.) Are you actually hungry or are you just angry, stressed, anxious or board? If it’s any of the latter feelings, healthy snacks like carrot sticks and apples won’t seem appealing. If you’re not hungry enough to eat a plant, vow to not eat anything at all.

An American Society For Clinical Nutrition study found that avoiding periodic binging was linked to a 60 percent higher chance of maintaining weight for over a year. To help you combat the urge to dive fork-first into a guilt-ridden meal, make sure your kitchen is stocked with healthy picks and toss out any possible trigger foods. If the mere sight of a Ben & Jerry’s in your freezer usually sets off an uncontrollable course of overeating, avoiding stocking up on the pints at the supermarket and adopt these 25 Food Swaps That Cut 2,500 Calories a Week.
When many of us have too many options to choose from, we often become flustered and make the wrong decision. Same goes for food. If you have a few different boxes of cereal and a handful of flavors of potato chips, you’re likely to eat more of the packaged stuff. Limiting your options to just one can cut down on your grazing habits and prevent a snack attack.
Before you begin the habit of refilling your water bottle several times a day, make sure yours isn’t laced with BPA. A Harvard study found that adults with the highest concentration of BPA in their urine had significantly larger waists and a 75 percent greater chance of being obese than those in the lowest quartile. No wonder why drinking out of plastic bottles is one of our 40 Bad Habits That Make You Fat! To avoid weight gain, make sure your bottle is BPA-free and be particularly wary of plastics that sport a #7 recycling symbol on them, which is an indicator that BPA may be present.
You’ve probably already heard that drinking water helps you keep weight off. There’s some serious truth to this. “Research suggests that drinking eight to ten glasses of water (eight fluid-ounces each) a day can boost metabolism by 24-30 percent and suppress appetite,” explains Dr. Petre. If you’re not thirsty enough for this amount of H2O, chances are that you’re consuming too many other beverages, such as sugary sodas, juices, and alcohol. “Replacing those fluids with water helps your body stay hydrated. [And] it can save calories, money, and even help protect and clean your teeth,” notes Dr. Petre. Not a fan of the plain water taste? Add a slice of lime or lemon. “A glass of water with lemon is a recipe for successful weight loss because of pectin fiber, which can help reduce hunger,” Dr. Petre adds.
According to one study, cluttered kitchens can lead to over-snacking, especially if you’re feeling stressed. Researchers suggested that people might respond to a chaotic physical environment by lowering their self-control. Even if snacks aren’t on the counter, the sense of disorganization could lead you to consume more—particularly junky snacks—than you planned.

As seasoned professionals, registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) have an arsenal of info at the ready to use as starting points for clients, regardless of their individual weight journey. But when these approaches don't achieve the desired results, they can also help clients explore other avenues. We spoke with several nutrition pros to get the lowdown—what general advice works for most people, and which factors might be standing in the way of weight loss? Faced with these obstacles, how do dietitians tailor their advice to the individual?


I decided to give 'macro counting' a whirl. It's similar to calorie counting, but rather than keeping track of your calories, you keep track of the number of grams of protein, fat, and carbs you eat per day. Following this is what ended up giving me the biggest change overall. I felt like I wasn't starving myself or depriving myself to lose weight. You have to find something you can stick to. What works for one person may not work for another. Whatever you choose, it has to be for life."
Just as distracted driving negatively impacts your driving ability, distracted eating can cause you to ignore satiety signals, according to Kimberly Gomer, M.S., R.D., Direction of Nutrition at Pritikin Longevity Center & Spa. When you’re eating at your desk, in front of the TV, or even just scrolling through your social media feed, it’s harder to “hear” your body signal that it’s full, she says.

“This hits me in the heart every day I wake,” he says. “It gets me on my foam roller and my Versaclimber in the morning. It allows me to choose a healthy salad over junk food because I visualize myself running on the track with my children. Moment to moment, we are faced with decisions and it’s about being mindful to the ones that follow your ‘why’ path. Sure, I may be willing to drop a cheeseburger down the gullet because I am hungry and inconsiderate of the long game. However, if I am unwilling to be a father who is out-of-shape, my short game will match my long game vision and I will opt for a cleaner meal.”
Since tomatoes can be grown indoors, they never really go out of season, making them a reliable weight loss staple to add to your diet. The tasty fruits have a high water content that will help keep you hydrated, and they’re also low in calories. What’s more? A study published in Nutrition Journal found that eight weeks of tomato juice consumption helps the body burn about an additional 100 calories per day—that adds up to around 3,000 calories a month!
To lose weight, you'll need to consume fewer calories than you burn. The exact number will depend on your current weight and activity level, but generally, people should aim to cut 250 to 1,000 calories from their diet per day in order to lose 0.5 to 2 lbs. (0.2 to 0.9 kilograms) per week. There are calculators available to help you determine how many calories you should consume per day.
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