To do the Scapular Wall Hold Reps, stand with your back relaxing against the wall and your feet about six inches away. Bend your arms and drive your elbows back into the wall. With your body in a nice straight line, drive off the wall with your elbows, pressing your chest out and pinching your shoulder blades down and back. Brace your core and squeeze your glutes so your body moves as one unit.

While some women worry about the size of their hips, belly or thighs, other women feel that they have fat arms. Do your arms look as tight and firm as you'd like them to? If they don't, you're not alone. Almost all women struggle with some degree of flabbiness in their upper body and some of us even spend hours at the gym trying to lose arm fat or flabbiness in the upper back. 
Exercise acts as a temporary diversion to daily stresses and it improves self-esteem. Increased core temperature during exercise may lead to reduced muscle tension and favourable alterations in brain neurotransmitters. Mood improvements may also occur due to the increased secretion of endogenous (internal) opiates, e.g. endorphins. Psychological changes may occur because of changes in norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin, all hormones which can affect mood and anxiety levels.
You’ve recently tried on a strapless dress and noticed that your arms are looking soft and flabby. Having excess fat on your arms can cause self-consciousness about showing off your upper body. You aren’t doomed to a lifetime of long-sleeved shirts. It is not possible to target one area of your body for fat loss, but decreasing your total body fat percentage will give your arms a slimmer appearance. You can quickly trim inches off your arms with diet and exercise.
Ah, arm fat. You know what it is. And let’s be honest. We all know we shouldn’t make a big deal of such things (all body types are beautiful, after all). But there is still a moment’s hesitation we all face when it comes to donning a cute spaghetti top or sleeveless dress. If there’s one word to describe arm fat, it would have to be stubborn. And no matter how much you control your diet or cut back on dessert, arm fat still seems to stay. Irritating, right? But before figuring out a way to reduce flabby arms muscles, it’s important to know what leads to the accumulation of arm fat.

Well, good (bad?) news: People who have dedicated their professional lives to defying Newton's First Law (you know them as "personal trainers") don't often have the luxury of skipping a sweat session. Next time you find yourself in need of a workout but without any of the things you think you need to get one, we got them to share the best workouts and circuits and exercises you can do anyway—no gear required.


That stubborn back-of-the-arm fat is some of the hardest to ditch, but making tricep presses part of your routine can help tone and tighten that area fast. While seated, extend a dumbbell over your head, holding it with both arms. Next, bend your elbows and bring the dumbbell behind you until it’s parallel with your shoulders, straighten your arms and lift the weight, and repeat.
Exercise and physical activity are a great way to feel better, boost your health and have fun. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity a week, or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity. Examples include running, walking or swimming. Fit in strength training for all the major muscle groups at least twice a week by lifting free weights, using weight machines or doing body-weight exercises.

Want to see those arms getting leaner in a hurry? Try adding some dips to your routine. While there are resistance machines that can help you tackle this exercise, it’s also easily accomplished using parallel bars or even a sturdy chair at home. With your arms shoulder-width apart by your waist, grip whatever surface you’re dipping on. Bend your elbows at a 90-degree angle, bringing your whole body down, and extend to straighten your arms again. Not only does this help build strong triceps, it can also help you define your pectoral muscles, making your whole upper body look and feel stronger.


Start the clock, and do as many squats as you can — while maintaining perfect form — for 30 seconds. Then rest for 10 seconds, and do as many single-leg deadlifts as you can (again, with perfect form) for 30 seconds. Stick to one leg with the deadlifts for the full 30 seconds. Then rest for 10 seconds again. Finish up with 30 seconds of glute bridges. Rest for a minute or two, and then start all over again.
It strengthens the brain. Studies have found that working out can lessen the severity of memory problems in older adults, and even decrease the risk of diseases like Alzheimer's. It can also have a positive benefit on the brain function of younger people. Research out of New Zealand shows that exercise improves executive function -- the general brain processes that include planning, memory, reasoning, problem-solving and more.
Downward dog is another Sun Salutation pose that tones the arms. For this pose, your body will form a reverse V-shape with your heels pressed down or close to the floor and your hands flat on the floor. Ideally, your spine will follow a straight line toward the ground with your hips pressed back. You may need to bend your knees to keep your body in the reverse V-shape.

HOW TO DO IT: Start with your weight on your right leg with your knee bent. Bent your left knee so your foot is slightly off the ground. Push off your right leg and jump to your left, landing softly and holding that position for a one-count, keeping your hips back and down throughout. Reverse the movement and repeat, gradually increasing your speed and range of motion.
Begin in a plank position on the forearms. Press the hips up toward the ceiling while staying on the forearms (like an upside 'v') and gently press the heels to the floor. Hold briefly, then come back to your plank and push up onto the hands. Hold (back straight) for a few counts and then press back into a downward dog, stretching the heels to the floor and the chest gently through the arms. Come back into your plank, lower down to the elbows and repeat the entire series.
You probably have a vague sense that exercise is good for you—and you’ve probably heard that it’s “healthy for the heart.” But if you’re like most people, that’s not enough motivation to get you to break a sweat with any regularity. As I report in the TIME cover story, “The Exercise Cure,” only 20% of Americans get the recommended 150 minutes of strength and cardiovascular physical activity per week, more than half of all baby boomers report doing no exercise whatsoever, and 80.2 million Americans over age 6 are entirely inactive.

Poorly toned triceps -- the muscles on the backs of the arms -- can cause arms to be loose and jiggly. Tone up this area with standing overhead triceps extensions. Hold a light weight in your left hand with your arm straight above your head, elbow by your ear. Keep your upper arm still as you bend the elbow and forearm to bring the weight behind your head. Return to start position and repeat 10 to 12 times or until fatigue sets in. Repeat on the right arm and complete three sets in total per arm.


Start by placing a chair on a sturdy surface against a wall with the seat facing towards you. You can also do tricep dips on the edge of a staircase (such as the 2nd or 3rd step from the bottom) or a workout bench. Stand 1 to 2 feet (0.30 to 0.61 m) in front of the edge of the seat of the chair. Place your hands behind you, shoulder width apart with your fingers gripping the edge of the chair. Bend your knees so they are at a 90-degree angle and your knees are directly above your ankles.
Sit on the floor with your legs and feet joined together, knees bent and feet placed flat on the floor. Place your hands on the floor about a foot behind your hips, palms kept shoulder-width apart and fingers pointing towards your back. Now, raise your hips off the floor by straightening your arms. Bend your right elbow to lower your hips as close to the floor as possible, without touching it. Straighten your right arms and bend your left elbow to again lower your hips as close to the floor as possible. Repeat on alternate sides.
But the idea that banging out a workout when you don't have access to your usual equipment or space is one that trainers are quick to debunk. Sure, they know their way around a gym floor and a smart workout program, but they also know that when you're traveling, ultra busy, or just don't feel like dealing with the gym, a routine of challenging bodyweight exercises will get the job done.
Bend your knees to lower down into a split squat. Your left knee should ideally form a 90-degree angle so that your thigh is parallel to the ground, and your right knee is hovering above the floor. (Quick position check: your left foot should be stepped out far enough that you can do this without letting your left knee go past your left toes—if you can't, hop your left foot out a bit farther away from the bench.)
But here’s the most important thing to remember about arm fat: It’s totally normal. So many women have it because, thanks to our higher estrogen levels, we store more fat than men. On average, women carry 6 to 11 percent more body fat than men do, according to Australian research. After all, women need a certain amount of fat to be healthy—a minimum of 12 percent of their total weight, to be exact, should come from essential fat, which is found in your heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, intestines, muscles, and tissues of the central nervous system, according to the National Academy of Sports Medicine.
Aerobic exercise revs up blood flow to the skin, delivering oxygen and nutrients that improve skin health and even help wounds heal faster. “That’s why when people have injuries, they should get moving as quickly as possible—not only to make sure the muscle doesn’t atrophy, but to make sure there’s good blood flow to the skin,” says Anthony Hackney, an exercise physiologist at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Train long enough, and you’ll add more blood vessels and tiny capillaries to the skin, too.
The benefits of exercise diminish within weeks after a person stops exercising. Heart strength, muscle strength, and the level of HDL cholesterol decrease, whereas blood pressure and body fat increase. Even former athletes who stop exercising do not retain measurable long-term benefits. However, people who were physically active in the past often can regain fitness faster.

But back to why you’re here. While there’s no magic trick for how to get rid of arm fat, there are certainly some ways help you along your way to the defined arms you desire. The 8fit Pro app also has workout programs that target specific body parts like your arms. See it as a form of pottery; you’re looking to shed the excess material before you get into chiseling the fine, intricate details. We’ll go into more detail below.
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