Coffee has also been linked to lower risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. A 2009 study from Finland and Sweden showed that, out of 1,400 people followed for about 20 years, those who reported drinking 3-5 cups of coffee daily were 65% less likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, compared with nondrinkers or occasional coffee drinkers.
Basically, I blend coconut oil and grass-fed organic unsalted butter (yes … butter) into coffee with a dash of vanilla and sometimes a drop of stevia. The blender emulsifies the coconut oil and butter so the texture is more creamy than oily and it is a delicious way to get a boost of beneficial fats. This type of healthy coffee also gives much more extended energy throughout the day without making me jittery.
Coffee beans have important nutrients like the B-family vitamins, including riboflavin, pantothenic acid, and niacin, as well as other nutrients like potassium, manganese, and magnesium. Perhaps most importantly, they contain antioxidants and caffeine, which have a wide range of health benefits when consumed in moderation and at right times during the day.

Coffee has also been linked to lower risk of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. A 2009 study from Finland and Sweden showed that, out of 1,400 people followed for about 20 years, those who reported drinking 3-5 cups of coffee daily were 65% less likely to develop dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, compared with nondrinkers or occasional coffee drinkers.
If you think your morning cup of joe provides nothing more to your body than a jolt of caffeine, you might be pleasantly surprised to learn that your daily cup (or three) provides some health benefits as well. Drinking moderate amounts of coffee (including decaf) has been linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, Parkinson's disease and some cancers.
Coffee is not traditionally thought of as anti-carcinogenic, but it has been linked specifically to the prevention of two types of cancer – liver and colorectal cancer, which are the 3rd and 4th deadliest forms of cancer, respectively. It has also shown good results in preventing the occurrence of melanoma in people who consume it regularly. Research says that coffee drinkers have 43% lesser risk of cancer than those who do not drink it.
When you’ve ordered a latte or a cappuccino at Starbucks, you’ve probably watched as the barista wipes down the steamer before whipping up a new cup. This is meant to fight bacteria, but you may be getting something extra in your drink that you probably don’t want. “What you don’t realize is that sanitizing solution ends up in your frothed milk! It’s not a ton, but it is there—a small amount on that wand for every frothed carafe! So avoiding lattes is a good choice if that concerns you,” Immer says. Or just prepare yours at home to make sure you’re not getting more than you bargained for. This is the healthiest coffee you can drink.
If you want a caffeine boost, but get too jittery or anxious with the two to four shots of espresso typically found in coffee drinks, order a tea latte with one shot of espresso. A typical shot of espresso contains around 64 milligrams of caffeine, while a cup of tea can range from 30 to 75 milligrams. Combining both can give you that energy boost without so much intensity.

"Caffeine for treatment of Parkinson disease" Ronald B. Postuma, MD, MSc, Anthony E. Lang, MD, Renato P. Munhoz, MD, Katia Charland, PhD, Amelie Pelletier, PhD, Mariana Moscovich, MD, Luciane Filla, MD, Debora Zanatta, RPh, Silvia Rios Romenets, MD, Robert Altman, MD, Rosa Chuang, MD and Binit Shah, MD. doi:10.1212/WNL.0b013e318263570d August 1, 2012. Abstract. Accessed 15 December 2013.
A growing body of research suggests an association between coffee drinking and a reduced risk of diabetes. A 2009 study found that the risk of developing diabetes dropped by 7 percent for each daily cup of coffee. Previous epidemiological studies reported that heavy coffee drinkers (those who regularly drink four or more cups daily) had a 50 percent lower risk of developing diabetes than light drinkers or nondrinkers.
After one too many long nights at the office, it’s not uncommon to experience mental fatigue. In addition to getting your mental health back on track to make sure it doesn’t lead to more serious health problems, drink some coffee: A 2010 review in the journal Nutrition found caffeine can help decrease the exhaustion you’re feeling by perking your body up.
If you’re constantly resisting down the urge to hit your bloodstream with caffeine, relax. It’s really okay to get a steady stream of java—so long as you’re stopping at a reasonable time before bed (typically 2 p.m., since coffee has a half-life of 8-10 hours), not swallowing a pot a day, and avoiding syrups and artificial sweeteners (check out these 15 ultra-healthy add-ins instead). And we’re not just saying so because the energy jolt is just that good. Coffee also has a slew of health benefits.
People who regularly workout drink coffee half an hour before for a burst of energy so they can get the most of their exercise. The burst of caffeine increases epinephrine levels in the blood, which makes the body ready for any physical exertion. This allows people to push themselves longer and harder to begin seeing immediate results from their exercise regimen.
Here’s a way to add a little seasonal flair to your caffeine routine while also supporting heart health and balancing blood sugar levels. (PSL, can you do that?) Adding a pinch of cinnamon can boost antioxidants, lower your blood sugar, and even cut your risk of heart disease. Plus, it tastes so good that you might finally kick the cream and sugar habit because, really, it doesn't need anything else.
The contents displayed within this public group(s), such as text, graphics, and other material ("Content") are intended for educational purposes only. The Content is not intended to substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding your medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read in a public group(s).
Bulletproof coffee is considered a “healthier” version of coffee because it has butter and coconut oil, which contains medium-chain fats that have been shown in studies to have a beneficial effect on blood lipids—lowering triglycerides and raising HDLs. As president and chief culinary officer at Culinary Health Solutions, Ken Immer, CCHE explains, “The fats from the butter and coconut milk are a great combination to ‘prime the energy pump’ in the morning. You’ll give your coffee some ‘bite’ that keeps you going until lunchtime, plus you’ll get all of the additional nutrients, especially when we choose grass-fed butter.” You can either buy Bulletproof or make it yourself at home. Find out 8 myths about coffee you should know.
You might think that nonfat, sugar-free vanilla syrup is a healthy choice, but low-calorie doesn’t always translate to health benefits. Swinney suggests weaning yourself off sweeteners completely if you can, but if you can’t, be super picky about the additives you’re putting into your brew. “Pick organic cream to whiten your coffee or make your own packaging-free alternative milk from oats or nuts. Creamers often have artificial flavors, sweeteners, and other additives, so you’re better off using organic milk or cream plus organic brown sugar,” she says. Next, don’t miss these 13 surprising uses for coffee.
×